2011
Castello D'Alba Vintage
750ml
$75.99
$64.99
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2012 Lambert Tempranillo 'Tempt Me' 750ml

2012 Lambert Tempranillo 'Tempt Me'

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Light cherry, plum, and strawberry on both the nose and the palate. Medium bodied with low acid and soft tannins. Mature elegant and complex. Well suited to accompany a range of appetizers and tapas. - Schneider's of Capitol Hill

Producer: Lambert Estate
Website: http://www.lambertestate.com/

Condition/Note:
Price: $17.99
Sale Price: $9.99



Available Vintages:
2012(750ml)  


Varietal: Tempranillo
Coined by Jancis Robinson as "Spain’s answer to Cabernet Sauvignon," its style varies significantly depending on terroir and the wine-making techniques used. Cooler regions and stainless steel fermentation tend to produce Tempranillos with fresh strawberry and cherry like fruit, similar in body to Pinot Noir. Examples from hotter, more arid regions that undergo extended oak aging often produce richer, plumper, jammier wines, typically exhibiting chocolate, tobacco, and leather notes. Tempranillo provides the backbone of the highly regarded wines of Rioja, Toro and Ribera del Duero. In Rioja particularly, it is typically blended with Garnacha (Grenache), Mazuelo (Carignan) and Graciano. In La Mancha and Navarra, it is commonly blended with Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot to produce inexpensive, great-value wines. One of the few places Tempranillo has spread to is Spain’s neighbour, Portugal. Grown mainly in the Douro valley since the mid 19th century, where they call it Tinta Roriz, it is used as one of the key blending agents in port. Lately it has been used in the region's intensely rich, dry, table wines.

Country: Australia
As the sixth largest producer and fourth largest exporter Australia is now one of the world's most important wine producing countries. Because vinifera vines are not native to Australia, most of the vines are descendants from cuttings imported by early European immigrants. Wineries started producing on a commercial scale in the first half of the 19th century, and since then the industry has experienced some of the biggest evolutionary developments. Originally focusing on replicating the fortified wines of the Old World including Port and Sherry, winemakers also developed their own idiosyncratic styles such as the fortified Muscats and Tokays of north east Victoria, not to mention the more recent, dry Semillons from the Hunter Valley region. The majority of the countries nearly 2000 wineries are relatively new (since 1970) boutique-sized operations, however about 95% of annual production is controlled by the five large companies including; Casella (Yellow Tail), Pernod Richard (Jacob's Creek), and Foster's (Lindemans and Penfolds).For high quality Shiraz and Cabernet Sauvignon, look no further than the regions of Coonawarra, Langhorne Creek, McLaren Vale, Barossa and Clare Valley. In Western Australia, the Margaret River leads in producing Bordeaux style reds as well as elegant barrel-aged Pinots and Chardonnays.

Region: South Australia
Accounting for nearly half of the country’s production, South Australia is one of the most important wine producing regions and consequently reflects the majority of our selection of Australian wine. Production is focused in the south eastern corner around Adelaide where the sub-regions Barossa Valley, McLaren Vale, Adelaide Hills, and Clare Valley are located. Further south in the state is the Limestone Coast Zone where the cooler sub-regions of Padthaway and Coonawarra produce some of the country’s finest Cabernet Sauvignon.

Sub-Region: Barossa Valley

Type: Red
Red wine is wine made from dark-coloured grape varieties. The color of red differs based on the grapes variety or varieties used. Interestingly, black grapes yield a juice that is greenish-white. The actual red color comes from anthocyan pigments (also called anthocyanins) from the skin of the grape (exceptions are the relatively uncommon teinturier varieties, which produce a red colored juice). Most of the production centers around the extraction of color and flavor from the grape skin.