2017
Superbloom Chardonnay
750ml
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2018 Mas Olivier Faugeres Expession White 750ml

2018 Mas Olivier Faugeres Expession White

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Price: $29.99
Sale Price: $25.99



Available Vintages:
2018(750ml)  


Varietal: Syrah or Shiraz
Depending on where it's grown and how it's made, the variety has two names. In France, where it goes by Syrah, it makes a huge contribution to the red wines of the Rhone Valley. In the southern Rhone villages of Chateauneuf-du-Pape, Gigondas, and Vacqueyras it is blended with a number of varieties but mainly Grenache. It is in the northern Rhone, including Hermitage, Crozes-Hermitage,Côte-Rôtie, St. Joseph, where it most often stands out on its own, and is only occasionally blended with the region's white grapes. More recently, in the late 20th Century, Shiraz has put Australian producers such as Penfolds and d’Arenberg on the fine wine map, with cult wines like "Grange" and "The Dead Arm". Generally speaking, the style from the old world is more savoury, expressing aromas of pepper, cured meat and leather. The hotter climate experienced in Australia results in more upfront, dense and even jammy fruit. The grape has also taken off with rapid success in California and Washington, as well as South Africa and New Zealand. Producers in these regions often name their varietal wines according to the style they intend.

Country: France
A country viewed by many as the home of fine wine, it is almost unique in terms of how embedded food and wine is in the nations culture. Given the diverse geography, with so much of the country providing the climate and soil suitable for viticulture, it is no surprise that its produces such an extensive and varied selection of wines. It is the country from where the vast majority of the New World's most popular "international" grapes and stylistic influences originate. While there might seem to be an alarming disparity between the most sought after wines (were a case might set you back as much as a deposit on a small house) and the millions of gallons of vin de table filling up the European wine lake every year, there is so much great value to be found between the two extremes. Bordeaux, Burgundy, Champagne, and the Rhone may still dominate the market for fine wine, but regions including the Loire, Alsace, Languedoc & Roussillon and the South West are increasingly becoming excellent sources of good quality, affordable wines.

Region: Languedoc and Roussillon
The Languedoc and Roussillon are two adjoining but distinctly separate wine regions in southern France. The Languedoc consists of two main regions: The Aude, home to the sub-regions of Limoux, Corbieres, Fitou, Minervois, and the Herault, which includes Picpoul de Pinet and the vin doux naturels producing regions of Banyuls, Frontignan, Lunel and Mireval.

Sub-Region: St. Emilion
St. Emilion is the largest of Bordeaux’s right bank appellations, however unlike the grand estates of the Medoc, it is composed of hundreds of small producers, also referred to as garagistes. Merlot and Cabernet Franc dominate with the former accounting for about 60% of all plantings. Some Cabernet Sauvignon is grown, however careful site selection is important as the soils are generally too warm. While the Medoc (left bank) was ranked under the official 1855 classification, it wasn’t for another hundred years until the St. Emilion rolled its own. Where the 1855 classification has only been changed three times, St. Emilion’s, by comparison, is far more dynamic, with a new list drawn up everything ten years. However, as the 2006 classification demonstrated, changes, particularly when producers are demoted, are fiercly contest. Finally passed by the legislature in 2009, the classification comprised of 15 Premier Grand Crus classes and 53 Grands crus classes. The Premiers are broken down further into two groups classes A and B, with Châtea Ausone and Châtea Cheval Blanc in the former and the remaining 13, including such revered producers as Château Angélus, Château Pavie, and Château Figeac, in the latter.

Type: White
White wine is a wine whose color can be pale-yellow, yellow-green, and yellow-gold colored. The wine is produced from a variety of grape varieties. The flavor and color comes from the juice of the grape and sometimes the skin of the grape as well. Interestingly, not all white wine comes from white grapes. Some select red grapes are used as in Champagne.