1999
Chateau Brisson Cotes de Castillon
750ml
$49.99
$39.99
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NV Belle Jardin Blanc de Blanc Brut 750ml

NV Belle Jardin Blanc de Blanc Brut

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Belle Jardin exhibits light floral aromas with secondary toasty notes. On the palate, the wine displays a fine texture and bead with a lingering clean finish. Excellent as an aperitif or mixing for Kir Royale or Mimosas. Perfectly balanced, it combines an elegant flavor with an exhilarating freshness. Lively yet refined, it’s an ideal choice for all celebrations. - Winemaker's Notes

Producer: To be added
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Condition/Note:
Price: $14.99
Sale Price: $12.99



Available Vintages:
NV(750ml)  


Varietal: White Blend
Includes white wines that are either made from a number of varieties and where no one is predominant, or the blend is propitiatory. For other blends see Champagne and Port Blends.

Country: France
A country viewed by many as the home of fine wine, it is almost unique in terms of how embedded food and wine is in the nations culture. Given the diverse geography, with so much of the country providing the climate and soil suitable for viticulture, it is no surprise that its produces such an extensive and varied selection of wines. It is the country from where the vast majority of the New World's most popular "international" grapes and stylistic influences originate. While there might seem to be an alarming disparity between the most sought after wines (were a case might set you back as much as a deposit on a small house) and the millions of gallons of vin de table filling up the European wine lake every year, there is so much great value to be found between the two extremes. Bordeaux, Burgundy, Champagne, and the Rhone may still dominate the market for fine wine, but regions including the Loire, Alsace, Languedoc & Roussillon and the South West are increasingly becoming excellent sources of good quality, affordable wines.

Region: Alsace
Alsace is a viticulturally and geographically unique region of France. Due to the historical toing and froing between France and Germany, Alsace has developed, along with its own dialect, a distinct style of food and wine. Unlike the rest of France who market their wine by location Alsace makes varietal wines, an overwhelming majority of which are white. Although separated from Germany by the Rhine, Alsace's climate is more similar to its neighboring country because of the Vosges mountain range to the west, but which extends south into Germany. The Vosges stops most clouds from heading east and making Alsace the driest region in France. Major varieties include Riesling, Gewürztraminer, Pinot Gris, Pinot Blanc, Muscat and Pinot Noir. Although still wines make up the biggest proportion, Crémants d’Alsace are becoming a popular, less expensive alternatives to Champagne. Most are made from Pinot Blanc, however some Blanc de Noirs, made from Pinot Noir, are also produced. Alsace’s trump card is probably its Vendange Tardive (late picked) and sub category, Sélection de Grains Nobles. These are some of the most complex and age worthy wines in the country and are only made in the finest of vintages when weather permits.

Sub-Region: Asti
A town and subregion of south east Piedmont and also the name of the sparkling white wine it, along with its larger neighbouring provinces; Cuneo and Alessandria, produces. While the region makes a range of light red wines from native varieties including Barbera, Dolcetto and Gignolino to name a few, it is the Moscato Bianco (Muscat Blanc a Petits Grains) grape that is of most commercial importance. The region produces two differing styles of sparkling, Asti Spumante and Moscato d'Asti. Asti Spumante indicates a fully sparkling off dry style, which is now just referred to as Asti. The spumante was dropped out of its name when it was elevated to DOCG status in 1993 in an attempt by producers to differentiate itself from other regions who also included Spumante in the name of their sparkling wine. Moscato d'Asti is Asti's frizzante (semi-sparkling), sweeter and lower alcohol cousin, typically made with the ripest and healthiest grapes. Unlike Champagne where a second fermentation is carried out in order to make the wine sparkling, Asti and Moscato d'Asti acquires its carbonation during its one and only fermentation in stainless stell tanks. Asti is normally fermented to 7-9.5% abv Asti's and Moscato d'Astis to 5-5.5% abv. Asti's are prized for their pronounced youthful and exotic fruit forward aroma and are therefore generally non vintage, intended for drinking very young. The wines are normally served chilled in Champagne flutes and while quite high in residual sugar good examples will have enough acidity to make them compatible with a range of sweet and savoury dishes.

Type: Sparkling
Sparkling wine is a wine with high levels of carbon dioxide in it making it bubble. The carbon dioxide is a result of natural fermentation, either in a bottle or a specially designed tank, or as a result of carbon dioxide injection. Sparkling wine is usually white or rosé but there are many examples of red sparkling wines. The sweetness of sparkling wine can range from very dry "brut" styles to sweeter "doux" varieties. When one thinks of sparkling wine they usually think of Champagne, but this wine is exclusively produced in the Champagne region of France and many sparkling wines are produced in other countries and regions. Most countries reserve the word Champagne for a specific type from the Champagne region of France. The French terms "Mousseux" or "Crémant" are used to refer to sparkling wine not made in the Champagne region. German and Austrian sparkling wines are called Sekt. The United States is a significant producer of sparkling wine with producers in numerous states. Recently the United Kingdom, which produced some of the earliest examples of sparkling wine, has started producing sparkling wines again.