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2013 Kennedy Point Syrah 750ml

2013 Kennedy Point Syrah

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Producer: Kennedy Point
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Price: $39.99

Availability: 2

Available Vintages:
2013(750ml)  


Varietal: Syrah or Shiraz
Depending on where it's grown and how it's made, the variety has two names. In France, where it goes by Syrah, it makes a huge contribution to the red wines of the Rhone Valley. In the southern Rhone villages of Chateauneuf-du-Pape, Gigondas, and Vacqueyras it is blended with a number of varieties but mainly Grenache. It is in the northern Rhone, including Hermitage, Crozes-Hermitage,Côte-Rôtie, St. Joseph, where it most often stands out on its own, and is only occasionally blended with the region's white grapes. More recently, in the late 20th Century, Shiraz has put Australian producers such as Penfolds and d’Arenberg on the fine wine map, with cult wines like "Grange" and "The Dead Arm". Generally speaking, the style from the old world is more savoury, expressing aromas of pepper, cured meat and leather. The hotter climate experienced in Australia results in more upfront, dense and even jammy fruit. The grape has also taken off with rapid success in California and Washington, as well as South Africa and New Zealand. Producers in these regions often name their varietal wines according to the style they intend.

Country: New Zealand
Although vines have been planted in New Zealand for nearly 200 years dating back to 1819, it has only been relatively recently, since the 1970s, that wine production has taken off on a commercial level. The industry has grown at a phenomenal rate with exports increasing six fold in the first decade of the 21st century, and has now surpassed more traditional agricultural exports such as wool. With a combined length roughly that of California's, most of the vineyards on the two islands experience a cool maritime climate. There is a clear climatic distinction between the two. The north island is slightly colder and damper, experiencing a similar climate to Bordeaux, while the southern island is slightly warmer and drier. Many growers are diversifying their planting with other varieties, notably Pinot Gris and Riesling, however Sauvignon Blanc, the grape New Zealand established its reputation with, increased in plantings nearly 4 fold between 2005 and 2010. The red wine industry is heavily reliant upon its number one red wine grape, Pinot Noir, which in some areas such as Central Otago accounts for 78% of total plantings, as of 2009.

Region: Waipara
Spanning nearly 200km of the South Island’s eastern coastline, with the magnificent Southern Alps to the west and sweeping Pacific Ocean to the east, vineyards are situated from Waimate in the south to Cheviot in the north. The area also includes the micro-climate of Banks Peninsula and Waipara Valley; Canterbury wine offers a diverse range of styles and producers plus many attractive cellar doors. Production was first established on the Canterbury Plains near Belfast in 1978 with vineyards to the south-west of Christchurch and Waipara Valley soon following. Waipara Valley is now heavily planted with its wines regularly achieving critical acclaim for their sub-regional expression. Exploration of new sub-regions both inland from Waipara Valley towards Weka Pass, and southward at Waitaki on the North Otago border forecasts increasing depth, further cementing the region’s overall reputation for elegant, expressive Pinot Noir, Chardonnay and aromatics in particular, though numerous other varieties are planted with good results. The cool, dry climate with good sunshine and long growing season promote full varietal expression; wines are renowned for their intense flavours, richness and complex fruit.

Sub-Region:

Type: Red
Red wine is wine made from dark-coloured grape varieties. The color of red differs based on the grapes variety or varieties used. Interestingly, black grapes yield a juice that is greenish-white. The actual red color comes from anthocyan pigments (also called anthocyanins) from the skin of the grape (exceptions are the relatively uncommon teinturier varieties, which produce a red colored juice). Most of the production centers around the extraction of color and flavor from the grape skin.