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Charles Clément Brut Pinot Noir
750ml
$39.99
$34.99
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2006 DSF Moscatel Roxo 750ml

2006 DSF Moscatel Roxo

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Producer: José Maria da Fonseca
Website: http://www.jmf.pt

Condition/Note:
Price: $29.99
Sale Price: $24.99

Availability: 8

Available Vintages:
2006(750ml)  


Varietal: Muscat
Muscat was one of the first grapes to be identified and cultivated and is, more accurately speaking, the name given to the family of four main sub-varieties. The most important is Muscat Blanc a Petits Grains and Muscat of Alexandria. Due to the high level of Monoterpenes they are almost unique in producing wines with a distinctively grapey and musky aroma. Muscat Blanc is fast becoming one of the world’s most popular light-skinned varieties making the Moscatel’s of Spain and Moscato’s of Italy. These wines are typically very fragrant and low-alcohol, sweet, sparkling wine. The grape is also grown in France, making bone-dry whites in Alsace and sweet fortified ‘Vins doux naturels’ in the hotter climes in south of the country. In Australia, it is the darker hued Muscat of Alexandria which forms the countries finest liqueur Muscats, delivering unctuous aromas of citrus peel and sweet spice. Good examples come from Barossa and Rutherglen Valley.

Country: Portugal
Portugal is a relatively small but diverse wine producing nation. Apart from supplying most of the world’s cork, it also makes two of the world’s most popular fortified wines, Port and Madeira. With a wealth of indigenous varieties, varied geography and modern wine producing technology, Portugal is now exporting a selection of unique and interesting quality table wines. Climates have a big impact on the style of wine. Regions within a stone’s throw of the coast are heavily influenced by the moderating effects of the Atlantic Ocean, whereas slightly further inland, temperatures rise considerably and precipitation drops dramatically. Even between neighboring regions these differences have a big impact on the styles of wine made. The difference between the coastal region of Minho (responsible for light, spritzy, Vinho Verde) and the wines of the Douro (home of Port) is a case in point. Southern Portuguese regions such as the Alentejo are showing promise with native varietals, Castelão, and Trincadeira, and white skinned grapes such as Arinto.

Region: Lisboa
Lisboa, until 2009 named Estremadura, is a Portuguese wine region covering the same areas as the Estremadura region, and taking its name from the country's capital.[1] The region is classified as a Vinho Regional (VR), a designation similar to a French vin de pays region. While the Beiras and Alentejo VRs are largest geographically, the Lisboa region is Portugal's largest producer of wine by volume. The region stretches from Lisbon along the Atlantic coast to the Bairrada DOC.[

Sub-Region:

Type: Fortified and Dessert
Dessert wines are usually any sweet wine drunk with or around a meal. White fortified wines (fino and amontillado sherry) are usually drunk before the meal, and the red fortified wines (port and madeira) drunk after it. Most fortified wines are regarded as distinct from dessert wines, but some of the less strong fortified white wines, are regarded as honorary dessert wines. In the United States a dessert wine is legally defined as any wine over 14% alcohol by volume, which includes all fortified wines.